Racial Harmony Platform Adopted

By unanimous approval of its voting membership, at meeting duly assembled in Morgantown, Monongalia County on April 24, 2010, the CPWV has adopted the following platform position on Racial Harmony.

We believe that the peoples of the world are a single family and have a common origin.  One possibility, offered in Scripture, is the story of the tower of Babel whereby, because of their disobedience to God’s command to be fruitful and populate the land, the congregated people had their one language “confounded” and were scattered over all the earth.  This then created genetic isolation which is perhaps the real cause for the origin of modern races of people.  We thus vehemently reject Darwinism, evolutionary theories, and their bigoted derivatives, accepting instead that “All men are created equal” and in His image.

The CPWV appreciates the wisdom of Booker T. Washington who proposed to a biracial audience in his 1895 Atlanta Compromise address, “In all things purely social we can be as separate as the fingers, yet one as the hand in all things essential to mutual progress.”  We profess that racism is properly defined as a form of collectivism, the mindset that views humans only as members of groups and never as individuals.” As such, we find nothing wrong with state celebrations and Dixie Decrees in remembrance of Confederate history, its honorable heroes, veterans and their family heritage.  America was founded by unique and rugged pioneers.  It was perseverant nonconformists of daring and optimistic mind-set who built our Republic, not huddled masses of inert complainers.

The corporate media has made much ado about our founders as slave owners, yet little has been said of their emphatic opposition to it.  Having been introduced to America some two centuries prior, slavery was not the product of any of their actions.  Instead, one of the driving forces for separation from Britain was that every attempt among the Colonies to end slavery had been thwarted or reversed by the Crown.  Richard Henry Lee made the pretense of this clear when he explained, “Christianity, by introducing into Europe the truest principles of humanity, universal benevolence, and brotherly love, had happily abolished civil slavery. Let us who profess the same religion practice its precepts… by agreeing to this duty.” In fact, in the years following America’s separation from Great Britain, the majority of the Founding Fathers who had owned slaves released them.  John Adams never owned any slaves.  And George Washington said, “I can only say that there is not a man living who wishes more sincerely than I do to see a plan adopted for the abolition of it [slavery].” His wish was almost granted when Thomas Jefferson’s original draft of the Declaration of Independence included an entire paragraph decrying slavery as both an “execrable commerce” and an “assemblage of horrors.” Other Founders outspoken about slavery were John Dickinson, William Livingston, Luther Martin, John Randolph, Caesar Rodney, James Wilson, John Witherspoon, and George Wythe.

In 1774, Benjamin Franklin and Benjamin Rush founded America’s first antislavery society.  John Jay, stating “that men should pray and fight for their own freedom and yet keep others in slavery is certainly acting a very inconsistent as well as unjust and perhaps impious part,” was president of a similar society in New York.  Other prominent Founding Fathers who were members of societies for ending slavery included James Madison, James Monroe, John Marshall and William Livingston.  Franklin also advanced the idea that slaves needed to be educated in order to become contributing members of a free society.  Based in part on the efforts of these men, Pennsylvania and Massachusetts abolished slavery in 1780; Connecticut and Rhode Island did so in 1784; New Hampshire in 1792; Vermont in 1793; New York in 1799; and New Jersey in 1804.  Thus it was the founders who were responsible for planting and nurturing the first seeds for the recognition of black equality and for the eventual end of slavery.  This fact is made clear by Richard Allen, a freed Christian slave from Pennsylvania who became the founder of the A.M.E. Church in America.  In an early address titled To the People of Color, Allen said, “Many of the white people [who] have been instruments in the hands of God for our good, even such as have held us in captivity, are now pleading our cause with earnestness and zeal.”

Yet despite all of this, there are still those who charge that in the Constitution, the Founders considered a black to be only three-fifths of a person.  This is yet another misportrayal of the truth since the records of the Constitutional Convention make clear that the three-fifths clause was actually an antislavery provision.  As Professor Walter Williams explains, “It was slavery’s opponents who succeeded in restricting the political power of the South by allowing them to count only three-fifths of their slave population in determining the number of congressional representatives. The three-fifths of a vote provision applied only to slaves, not to free blacks in either the North or South.” And, the so called Civil War was not about slavery as evidenced by Lincoln’s inaugural speech where he assured Americans that “I have no purpose, directly or indirectly, to interfere with the institution of slavery in the States where it exists. I believe I have no lawful right to do so, and I have no inclination to do so.” Furthermore, when Lincoln broke his promise, his Emancipation Proclamation did not free any of the slaves remaining in the northern states, and was signed almost two years after the unpleasantness began.  During various state ratifying conventions for the federal Constitution, secession was one of the key terms in agreeing to it.  In fact, right up until the conflict, secession was taught at West Point.  We find nothing wrong with the display of any of the various Confederate flags as symbols of heritage, fidelity, and respect.

The CPWV is not a hate group nor are we associated with any white supremacist militias as is wrongfully categorized by MIAC (Missouri Information Analysis Center), the Southern Poverty Law Center (SPLC), and its ideological twin, the Anti-Defamation League (ADL).  Nor were the Founding Fathers terrorists as BATFE agents have instructed and whistleblowers shown via hidden camera.  For these groups, any defense of the Constitution and the Bill of Rights represents “antigovernment extremism.”  As evidenced by the growing Tea Party movement, millions of Americans have independently arrived at the conclusion that the federal government is indeed an authoritarian leviathan.  Thus it appears that the SPLC, ADL, MIAC and their ilk are engaged in a desperate effort to silence the patriot movement through baseless accusations portraying it as a fringe phenomenon consisting of “dangerous radicals” and “domestic terrorists.”  Of course, this is nothing more than propaganda, character assassination, slander, and defamation; blatant hypocrisy which will not work.  These, or any other groups that would collectively misrepresent our principles, candidates, and activities, have absolutely zero credibility with us.  We hope that the awakening general public recognizes this and feels the same.

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